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So, you’ve decided to join the flood of firms moving to Texas, and you’ve narrowed down your search. Now, it’s a question of digging into the details, like affordable housing, good schools, and available amenities.

An oft-repeated rule of thumb for single family home real estate investors is something called the “1% rule.” Simply put, this means that monthly rents should equal to at least one percent of the purchase price of the home. This is a quick-and-dirty way to check whether a home has cashflow-generating potential. In other words, will there be much left over after all expenses are paid?

Prices are rising around the country, and the same is true for vacation homes. What we did not expect to see that was that even the second-tier of lesser-known vacation spots have also shot up in price, leaving few areas untouched by rapid price growth. Where are these under-inflated markets?

There’s been a lot of media coverage lately about booming housing prices. Some are pointing to big institutional buyers, like REITs, as a source of the problem. We tend to disagree. Here’s why.

For the last several years, we have been following the planning of the I-345 corridor re-development near downtown Dallas. The idea, which has been studied since 2014, revolves around dismantling a freeway that has bisected the city since the early 1970s and contributed to under-performance in nearby areas. In a conversation with Patrick Kennedy, one of the masterminds and proponents of the initiative, I thought about whether there is an obvious way to calculate which specific areas are most affected by under-development and are best placed for revival if the I-345 freeway is dismantled.

A tried-and-true method for any kind of debt reduction is the “snowball” method. It’s a metaphor for a ball of snow rolling down a hill and getting larger as it picks up more snow. It works amazingly well for real estate as well.

Our research revealed that it was an equal-opportunity power outage. Hardest-hit, however, were 63,000 households in areas that lacked both power and a backup sources of heat. The data suggest high-income areas did not experience fewer outages in this event, than other areas.

How-To

So, you’ve decided to join the flood of firms moving to Texas, and you’ve narrowed down your search. Now, it’s a question of digging into the details, like affordable housing, good schools, and available amenities.

An oft-repeated rule of thumb for single family home real estate investors is something called the “1% rule.” Simply put, this means that monthly rents should equal to at least one percent of the purchase price of the home. This is a quick-and-dirty way to check whether a home has cashflow-generating potential. In other words, will there be much left over after all expenses are paid?

A tried-and-true method for any kind of debt reduction is the “snowball” method. It’s a metaphor for a ball of snow rolling down a hill and getting larger as it picks up more snow. It works amazingly well for real estate as well.

Everyone has their favorite area to invest, but what if we wanted to be totally objective?

Continuing on our theme of improving neighborhoods in Dallas, we decided to look at the question from another angle: code violations.

How can we identify neighborhoods that are on the up-and-up? Places that are rapidly improving, where money is pouring in to keep houses fresh and up to date?

Market Analysis

Prices are rising around the country, and the same is true for vacation homes. What we did not expect to see that was that even the second-tier of lesser-known vacation spots have also shot up in price, leaving few areas untouched by rapid price growth. Where are these under-inflated markets?

There’s been a lot of media coverage lately about booming housing prices. Some are pointing to big institutional buyers, like REITs, as a source of the problem. We tend to disagree. Here’s why.

For the last several years, we have been following the planning of the I-345 corridor re-development near downtown Dallas. The idea, which has been studied since 2014, revolves around dismantling a freeway that has bisected the city since the early 1970s and contributed to under-performance in nearby areas. In a conversation with Patrick Kennedy, one of the masterminds and proponents of the initiative, I thought about whether there is an obvious way to calculate which specific areas are most affected by under-development and are best placed for revival if the I-345 freeway is dismantled.

Our research revealed that it was an equal-opportunity power outage. Hardest-hit, however, were 63,000 households in areas that lacked both power and a backup sources of heat. The data suggest high-income areas did not experience fewer outages in this event, than other areas.

For a real estate investor trying to fill a vacancy, it is not uncommon to find big differences between summer and winter.

Dallas-Fort Worth housing market boosted by record low mortgage rates.

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The co-working spaces of the future: close to suburban remote workers, affordable, and a step up from what’s out there today.

In 20 years, the urban area of Dallas-Fort Worth grew 40%+.

See the emergence of today’s Dallas-Fort Worth area in 15 seconds, as cities vie for the biggest in the region and suburbs become among the biggest cities the sprawling Metroplex.